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Levels and drivers of fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas

Adrian Arias, Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University
Joshua E. Cinner, Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University
Rhondda E. Jones, College of Marine and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University; Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University
Robert L. Pressey, Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-07999-200419

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Abstract

Effective conservation depends largely on people’s compliance with regulations. We investigate compliance through the lens of fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas (MPAs). MPAs are widely used tools for marine conservation and fisheries management. Studies show that compliance alone is a strong predictor of fish biomass within MPAs. Hence, fishers’ compliance is critical for MPA effectiveness. However, there are few empirical studies showing what factors influence fishers’ compliance with MPAs. Without such information, conservation planners and managers have limited opportunities to provide effective interventions. By studying 12 MPAs in a developing country (Costa Rica), we demonstrate the role that different variables have on fishers’ compliance with MPAs. Particularly, we found that compliance levels perceived by resource users were higher in MPAs (1) with multiple livelihoods, (2) where government efforts against illegal fishing were effective, (3) where fishing was allowed but regulated, (4) where people were more involved in decisions, and (5) that were smaller. We also provide a novel and practical measure of compliance: a compound variable formed by the number illegal fishers and their illegal fishing effort. Our study underlines the centrality of people’s behavior in nature conservation and the importance of grounding decision making on the social and institutional realities of each location.

Key words

Costa Rica; illegal fishing; livelihoods; marine reserve; poaching; poverty

Copyright © 2015 by the author(s). Published here under license by The Resilience Alliance. This article  is under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.  You may share and adapt the work for noncommercial purposes provided the original author and source are credited, you indicate whether any changes were made, and you include a link to the license.

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