Ecology and Society Ecology and Society
E&S Home > Vol. 19, Iss. 4 > Art. 56 > Abstract Open Access Publishing 
Trade-offs among forest value components in community forests of southwestern Amazonia

Christopher Baraloto, INRA, UMR Ecologie des Foręts de Guyane, French Guiana; Department of Biology, University of Florida, USA
Paula Alverga, Universidade Federal do Acre, Brazil
Sufer Baéz Quispe, Herbario Alwyn Gentry, Universidad Nacional Amazónica de Madre de Dios, Peru
Grenville Barnes, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, USA
Nino Bejar Chura, Herbario Alwyn Gentry, Universidad Nacional Amazónica de Madre de Dios, Peru
Izaias Brasil da Silva, Universidade Federal do Acre, Brazil
Wendeson Castro, Universidade Federal do Acre, Brazil
Harrison da Souza, Universidad Amazónica de Pando, Bolivia
Iracema de Souza Moll, Universidade Federal do Acre, Brazil
Jim del Alcazar Chilo, Herbario Alwyn Gentry, Universidad Nacional Amazónica de Madre de Dios, Peru
Hugo Duenas Linares, Herbario Alwyn Gentry, Universidad Nacional Amazónica de Madre de Dios, Peru
Jorge Garate Quispe, Herbario Alwyn Gentry, Universidad Nacional Amazónica de Madre de Dios, Peru
Dean Kenji, Universidad Amazónica de Pando, Bolivia
Herison Medeiros, Universidade Federal do Acre, Brazil
Skya Murphy, Department of Biology, University of Florida, USA
Cara A. Rockwell, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, USA
Alexander Shenkin, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, USA; Department of Biology, University of Florida, USA
Marcos Silveira, Universidade Federal do Acre, Brazil
Jane Southworth, Department of Geography and Land Use and Environmental Change Institute, University of Florida, USA
Guido Vasquez, Universidad Amazónica de Pando, Bolivia
Stephen Perz, Department of Sociology and Criminology & Law, University of Florida, USA

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-06911-190456

Full Text: HTML   
Download Citation


Abstract

Contemporary conservation interventions must balance potential trade-offs between multiple ecosystem services. In tropical forests, much attention has focused on the extent to which carbon-based conservation provided by REDD+ policies can also mitigate biodiversity conservation. In the nearly one-third of tropical forests that are community owned or managed, conservation strategies must also balance the multiple uses of forest products that support local livelihoods. Although much discussion has focused on policy options, little empirical evidence exists to evaluate the potential for trade-offs among different tropical forest value components.

We assessed multiple components of forest value, including tree diversity, carbon stocks, and both timber and nontimber forest product resources, in forest communities across the trinational frontier of Brazil, Peru, and Bolivia. We installed 69 0.5-ha vegetation plots in local communities, and we characterized 15 components of forest value for each plot. Principal components analyses revealed two major axes of forest value, the first of which defined a trade-off between diversity of woody plant communities (taxonomic and functional) versus aboveground biomass and standing timber volume. The second axis described abundance of commercial species, with strong positive loadings for density of timber and nontimber forest products, including Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) and copaiba oil (Copaifera spp.). The observed trade-off between different components of forest value suggests a potential for management conflicts prioritizing biodiversity conservation versus carbon stocks in the region. We discuss the potential for integrative indices of forest value for tropical forest conservation.

Key words

açai; biodiversity conservation; Brazil nut; carbon stocks; livelihood; NTFP; REDD; rubber; timber; tropical rainforest

Copyright © 2014 by the author(s). Published here under license by The Resilience Alliance. This article  is under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.  You may share and adapt the work for noncommercial purposes provided the original author and source are credited, you indicate whether any changes were made, and you include a link to the license.

Top
Ecology and Society. ISSN: 1708-3087