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Collaborative research to inform adaptive comanagement: a framework for the Heʻeia National Estuarine Research Reserve

Kawika B. Winter, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Heʻeia National Estuarine Research Reserve, Hawaiʻi; Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Hawaiʻi Conservation Alliance
Yoshimi M. Rii, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Heʻeia National Estuarine Research Reserve, Hawaiʻi
Frederick A. W. L. Reppun, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Heʻeia National Estuarine Research Reserve, Hawaiʻi
Katy DeLaforgue Hintzen, Heʻeia National Estuarine Research Reserve, Hawaiʻi; University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program
Rosanna A. Alegado, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program
Brian W. Bowen, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Leah L. Bremer, University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Makena Coffman, Institute for Sustainability and Resilience, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Jonathan L. Deenik, Tropical Plants and Soil Sciences, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Megan J. Donahue, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Kim A. Falinski, The Nature Conservancy, Hawaiʻi
Kiana Frank, Pacific Biosciences Research Center, Kewalo Marine Lab, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Erik C. Franklin, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Natalie Kurashima, Natural and Cultural Resources, Kamehameha Schools
Noa Kekuewa Lincoln, Tropical Plants and Soil Sciences, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Elizabeth M. P. Madin, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Margaret A. McManus, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Craig E. Nelson, Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education; University of Hawaiʻi Sea Grant College Program; Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Ryan Okano, Division of Aquatic Resources, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Hawaiʻi
Anthony Olegario, Division of Aquatic Resources, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Hawaiʻi
Pua'ala Pascua, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History, New York
Kirsten L. L. Oleson, Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Melissa R. Price, Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Malia Ana J. Rivera, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Kuulei S. Rodgers, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Tamara Ticktin, School of Life Sciences, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Christopher L. Sabine, Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Celia M. Smith, School of Life Sciences, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Alice Hewett, Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi
Rocky Kaluhiwa, Koʻolaupoko Hawaiian Civic Club
Māhealani Cypher, Koʻolau Foundation
Bill Thomas, Office for Coastal Management, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaiʻi
Jo-Ann Leong, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Kristina Kekuewa, Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Hawaiʻi
Jean Tanimoto, Office for Coastal Management, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaiʻi
Kānekoa Kukea-Shultz, Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi
A. Hiʻilei Kawelo, Paepae o Heʻeia
Keliʻi Kotubetey, Paepae o Heʻeia
Brian J. Neilson, Division of Aquatic Resources, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Hawaiʻi
Tina S. Lee, Lynker LLC; Office for Coastal Management, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaiʻi
Robert J. Toonen, Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-11895-250415

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Abstract

Globally, an increasing recognition of the importance of ecosystem-based management (EBM), Indigenous resource management (IRM), and Indigenous-led research and management is emerging; yet, case studies within scholarly literature illustrating comprehensive application of these theories and philosophies are scarce. We present the collaborative management model for the Heʻeia National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) as a contemporary Indigenous Community and Conserved Area (ICCA) that has synergistically operationalized these principles, as well as one that approaches research as a reciprocal collaboration with the Indigenous people and local community (IPLC) of place. The Heʻeia NERR was designated in 2017 through a process led by IPLC members in Hawaiʻi. This research framework is aimed at informing EBM within social-ecological systems. It, therefore, serves as an example of a program designed to demonstrate and provide practical solutions for adaptive resource management. The framework of the Heʻeia NERR embraces the values, perspectives, and IRM strategies that have been foundational for the people of the Pacific to thrive sustainably in the context of limited resources for millennia. As a program, the Heʻeia NERR aims to build bridges between coexisting worldviews as a means of informing policy in the realms of conservation and sustainability. We do this by weaving together conventional and Indigenous science to collaboratively develop research and collaboratively produce new knowledge. We examine these issues through the lens of holistic ecosystem services that consider both the reciprocal benefits that humans provide to nature as well as the full range of existential benefits that humans gain from nature. Research collaborations between the Heʻeia NERR and its partners (University of Hawaiʻi, state and federal agencies, and Indigenous-led NGOs operating in the community) are grounded in Indigenous and local knowledge (ILK) with applications that will guide a future of enhanced ecosystem services in a changing world.

Key words

ecosystem-based management (EBM); Indigenous and community conserved area (ICCA); Indigenous and local knowledge (ILK); Indigenous people and local community (IPLC); Indigenous resource management (IRM); Indigenous science; National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS); reciprocal collaboration

Copyright © 2020 by the author(s). Published here under license by The Resilience Alliance. This article is under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. You may share and adapt the work for noncommercial purposes provided the original author and source are credited, you indicate whether any changes were made, and you include a link to the license.

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