Table 2. Days per year of operation, specialty and commodity sawmills in the Columbia-Kootenay Region, 2000 to 2009 (personal communication, Sinclair Tedder, senior economist, Competitiveness and Innovation Branch, British Columbia Ministry of Forests and Range).†

 
Specialty mills
 
Commodity mills
Year Downie Timber Kalesnikoff Lumber Co. Wynndel Box & Lumber Co. J H Huscroft Porcupine Wood Products Meadow Creek Ltd Mean   Grand Forks Castlegar Midway Radium Hot Springs Canal Flats Elko Mean
2000 238 252 240 231 235 249 241   238 238 238 238 251 251 242
2001 235 250 239 229 215 259 238   223 243 223 228 237 238 232
2002 236 248 240 225 207 278 239   250 249 249 244 249 249 248
2003 236 240 240 225 250 243 239   253 251 241 245 208 233 239
2004 250 220 252 240 243 208 236   251 251 251 242 249 249 249
2005 228 225 242 230 192 245 227   247 248 248 246 214 254 243
2006 244 250 185 (230) 187 245 224   282 251 248 231 211 250 246
2007 234 228 240 239 234 145 220   217 222 0 231 0 0 112
2008 (211) 150 (240) (208) (230) 0 193   110 35 0 92 115 120 79
2009 243 247 222 210 (231) 0 192   61 0 0 92 115 120 65
10-year mean, 2000 to 2009 236 231 234 227 222 163 225   213
197
199 170 209 185 196 196
† Parentheses around days of operation indicate self reporting by mill when data were not available from or differed from the British Columbia Ministry of Forests and Range's data. The Castlegar mill was shut down from March 2008 to June 28, 2010. The Grand Forks mill was shut down from January 19 to October 24, 2009. Canfor (Canadian Forest Products Inc.) purchased the mill in Slocan from Slocan Forest Products Ltd. in 2003 and sold it to Springer Creek Forest Products Inc. in 2006. Springer Creek shut down in 2010 because of insufficient timber for the size mill (originally a commodity mill), and because it was unionized and thus had higher benefit packages, according to its human resources manager (personal communication, Tom Gilgan, December 2011). It was a mill that Canadian Forest Products had reportedly “dumped” along with part of its tenure in the area, because it was less profitable. For purposes of this calculation, this mill in Slocan is excluded because it was not viable either when operated by a commodity owner or by a specialty owner, and it did not have a long record with either during this decade. Notably, it was the largest specialty mill in our sample, and it produced a higher percentage of commodity lumber than other specialty mills.