Table 2. Potential benefits from, and obstacles to, Aboriginal commitment to forest certification.

 
Where applicable
Benefits

Increased control over forest management and involvement in decision making (Collier et al. 2002, National Aboriginal Forestry Association 1996)
Traditional territory

Greater protection of non-timber forest products (Collier et al. 2002) Traditional territory

Potential for economic benefit and capacity building for Aboriginal communities (Collier et al. 2002, Yukon Conservation Society 2003) Reserve land
Traditional territory

Improved relationship with the forest industry (Collier et al. 2002, National Aboriginal Forestry Association 1996) Traditional territory

Forest certification supplements governmental requirements when there is no regulation on Aboriginal rights (National Aboriginal Forestry Association 1996, Tollefson 2003, Smith 2004). Traditional territory


Obstacles

The approach to Aboriginal peoples as a special stakeholder differs by standard (Collier et al. 2002, Stevenson and Webb 2003, Smith 2004).

Traditional territory

Difficult to equalize terminology acceptable to both certification entities and Aboriginal groups (Parsons and Prest 2003, Stevenson and Webb 2003, Natcher et al. 2005, Wyatt 2008).
Reserve land
Traditional territory


Differences between traditional ecological knowledge and SFM indicators in content and data collection (Karjala et al. 2004, Smith 2004, Sherry et al. 2005). Reserve land
Traditional territory

Possible interference of some certification standards with legal processes establishing Aboriginal rights and title (Collier et al. 2002, Parsons and Prest 2003).

Reserve land
Traditional territory

Prohibitive cost increase in both direct and indirect cost of management (Collier et al. 2002, Mater 2005, Wyatt 2008).

Reserve land