Table 9. Judgments of forest practitioners on the importance of adaptation options to maintain and enhance long-term multiple socioeconomic benefits to meet the needs of societies from forest ecosystems in the Champagne and Aishihik Traditional Territory for each of three scenarios: “current climate conditions,” “low scenario of future climate change by the 2050s,” and “high scenario of future climate change by the 2050s.” Scale of 1 to 10 (0 = no importance, 1 = low importance, 10 = high importance) or don’t know. Results shown are the average rank and standard deviation (s.d.) of participants who provided a ranking. The percentage of participants who agree or strongly agree with the statement “this management option is currently being practiced in the Yukon” is also provided. Adaptation options in bold are considered to be “no-regrets” (option is ranked 7 or higher across range of scenarios).


Adaptation Option Current Practice Current
Importance
Importance Considering Projected Change 2050s
Low Scenario High Scenario
(%) Average Rank
(s.d.)
Average Rank
(s.d.)
Average Rank
(s.d.)
Anticipate variability and change and conduct vulnerability assessments at a regional scale 33 6.1 (2.6) 6.9 (2.6) 7.6 (2.7)
Foster learning and innovation, and conduct research to determine when and where to implement adaptive responses 67 7.5 (2.4) 7.7 (2.3) 8.1 (2.3)
Diversify forest economy, e.g., explore deadwood product markets, value-added products 84 8.2 (1.7) 8.3 (1.3) 8.4 (1.6)
Diversify regional economy (non-forest based) 56 8.2 (1.3) 8.4 (1.5) 8.8 (1.4)
Diversify the regional economy by promoting non-timber forest products 54 7.0 (2.1) 7.8 (1.7) 8.2 (1.7)
Enhance dialog among stakeholder groups to establish priorities for action on climate adaptation in the forest sector 73 7.0 (2.5) 7.4 (2.2) 7.7 (2.4)
Protect higher-value areas from fire through “fire-smart” techniques 90 7.7 (2.5) 7.9 (2.4) 8.1 (2.4)
Increase amount of timber from salvage logging of fire- or insect-disturbed stands 86 7.2 (2.7) 6.9 (2.6) 7.1 (2.7)
Enhance capacity to undertake integrated assessments of vulnerabilities at various scales 27 6.2 (2.8) 6.8 (2.3) 7.4 (2.5)
Review forest policies, forest planning, forest management approaches and institutions to assess our ability to achieve social objectives under climate change; encourage societal adaptation 57 7.3 (2.6) 7.8 (2.0) 8.1 (2.2)
Develop technology to use altered wood quality and tree species composition, modify wood processing technology 33 6.7 (2.2) 6.9 (1.9) 7.1 (2.1)
Make choice about the preferred tree species composition for the future; establish objectives for the future forest under climate change 7 6.9 (3.0) 7.3 (2.8) 7.6 (3.0)
Include risk management in management rules and forest plans, and develop and enhanced capacity for risk management 26 7.3 (2.4) 8.0 (1.9) 8.6 (1.5)
Conduct an assessment of greenhouse gas emissions produced by internal operations 10 5.0 (3.4) 5.5 (3.3) 5.9 (3.4)
Increase awareness about the potential impact of climate change on the fire regime and encourage proactive actions in regard to fuels management and community protection 83 7.8 (2.1) 8.3 (1.9) 8.4 (1.8)