Appendix 5. Relational Capital.

In water management, integration, in the sense of integrated catchment management, is usually a key concern. Following SLIM (2004f), we argue that integration must concurrently value the expression of local needs and interests through a bottom-up approach. In a knowledge-based society, people should be recognized for what they do and not just for what they are, i.e., their recognized status should be that of subjects, not objects. The added value of such an approach is the emergence of relational capital resulting from the presence and interactions of different elements of the other forms of capital, namely, natural, social, artificial, and human. The involvement of citizens, formal groups, enterprises, and institutions that share the same concerns facilitates the integration of sector-specific policies. However, these shared concerns can only become explicit when they are derived from collaborative knowing. The emergence of relational capital results from the presence and interactions of different elements of the other forms of capital.