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 E&S Home > Vol. 11, No. 1 > Art. 12 > Erratum

Erratum:  Exploring Resilience in Social-Ecological Systems Through Comparative Studies and Theory Development: Introduction to the Special Issue


Due to a reordering of articles in the special feature prior to publication, the text below:

“The first of these papers (Kinzig et al. 2006) offers a new insight into the complex ways in which multiple regime shifts occur in social-ecological systems, across domains, and across scales. The view of resilience that encompasses a single regime shift caused by a threshold on one, albeit dominant, variable, as in much of the work on lakes, rangelands, and irrigation systems mentioned above, is expanded to a more holistic view in which social-ecological systems have a number of thresholds at different scales and in both the ecological and socioeconomic domains. The second paper (Gunderson et al. 2006) provides an overview of how resilience, adaptability, and transformability play out in lake and wetland systems. The following three papers focus on different aspects of how the dynamics of social-ecological systems are determined. Abel et al. (2006) examine how two different outcomes occurred in each of two regions during the rapid “backloop” phases of change and the attributes of the systems that determined the outcomes. Next, Janssen et al. (2006) take a network perspective of social-ecological systems and look at how changing structures and connections in systems influence their resilience to external shocks. The third paper (Cumming et al. 2006) in this group examines the origins and effects of scale mismatches, an hypothesized cause of loss of resilience. The final two papers in this section deal with governance and resilience. The first (Lebel et al. 2006) addresses the question: Do certain governance attributes enhance the capacity of a society to manage resilience? The comparisons of a wide range of case studies produced a set of eight governance-related attributes that influence the resilience of the social-ecological systems involved. The last paper (Olsson et al. 2006), on navigating toward adaptive governance, compares five case studies in terms of their capacity to undergo transformation and identifies networks, especially “shadow” networks, and leadership as crucial attributes."

was rephrased to incorporate the correct article order. The corrected text, which now appears in the online article, is as follows:

“The first paper in this group (Cumming et al. 2006) examines the origins and effects of scale mismatches - a hypothesized cause of loss of resilience. The next (Janssen et al. 2006) takes a network perspective of social-ecological systems and looks at how changing structures and connections in systems influence their resilience to external shocks. The third paper (Gunderson et al. 2006) provides an overview of how resilience, adaptability, and transformability play out in lake and wetland systems. The following three papers focus on different aspects of how the dynamics of social-ecological systems are determined. Abel et al. (2006) examine how two different outcomes occurred in each of two regions during the rapid “backloop” phases of change and the attributes of the systems that determined the outcomes. Next, the paper by Olsson et al. (2006), on navigating toward adaptive governance, compares five case studies in terms of their capacity to undergo transformation and identifies networks, especially “shadow” networks, and leadership as crucial attributes. The third paper in this set (Lebel et al. 2006) deals with governance and resilience, addressing the question: Do certain governance attributes enhance the capacity of a society to manage resilience? The comparisons of a wide range of case studies produced a set of eight governance-related attributes that influence the resilience of the social-ecological systems involved. The last of the main papers (Kinzig et al. 2006] offers a new insight into the complex ways in which multiple regime shifts occur in social-ecological systems, across domains, and across scales. The view of resilience that encompasses a single regime shift caused by a threshold on one, albeit dominant, variable, as in much of the work on lakes, rangelands, and irrigation systems mentioned above, is expanded to a more holistic view in which social-ecological systems have a number of thresholds at different scales and in both the ecological and socio-economic domains."


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