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Resilience Management in Social-ecological Systems: a Working Hypothesis for a Participatory Approach

Brian Walker, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems
Stephen R Carpenter, University of Wisconsin-Madison
John M Anderies, Arizona State University
Nick Abel, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems
Graeme Cumming, University of Florida
Marco A Janssen, Indiana University
Louis Lebel, Unit for Social and Environmental Research
Jon Norberg, Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University
Garry D Peterson, McGill University
Rusty Pritchard, Emory University

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Abstract

Approaches to natural resource management are often based on a presumed ability to predict probabilistic responses to management and external drivers such as climate. They also tend to assume that the manager is outside the system being managed. However, where the objectives include long-term sustainability, linked social-ecological systems (SESs) behave as complex adaptive systems, with the managers as integral components of the system. Moreover, uncertainties are large and it may be difficult to reduce them as fast as the system changes. Sustainability involves maintaining the functionality of a system when it is perturbed, or maintaining the elements needed to renew or reorganize if a large perturbation radically alters structure and function. The ability to do this is termed “resilience.” This paper presents an evolving approach to analyzing resilience in SESs, as a basis for managing resilience. We propose a framework with four steps, involving close involvement of SES stakeholders. It begins with a stakeholder-led development of a conceptual model of the system, including its historical profile (how it got to be what it is) and preliminary assessments of the drivers of the supply of key ecosystem goods and services. Step 2 deals with identifying the range of unpredictable and uncontrollable drivers, stakeholder visions for the future, and contrasting possible future policies, weaving these three factors into a limited set of future scenarios. Step 3 uses the outputs from steps 1 and 2 to explore the SES for resilience in an iterative way. It generally includes the development of simple models of the system’s dynamics for exploring attributes that affect resilience. Step 4 is a stakeholder evaluation of the process and outcomes in terms of policy and management implications. This approach to resilience analysis is illustrated using two stylized examples.
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Ecology and Society. ISSN: 1708-3087