Ecology and Society Ecology and Society
E&S Home > Vol. 13, Iss. 2 > Art. 49 > Abstract Open Access Publishing 
Omora Ethnobotanical Park and the UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve

Eugene C Hargrove, University of North Texas
Mary T. K. Arroyo, Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity
Peter H Raven, Missouri Botanical Garden
Harold Mooney, Stanford University

Full Text: HTML   
Download Citation


Abstract

The biocultural conservation and research initiative of Omora Ethnobotanical Park and the UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve was born in a remote part of South America and has rapidly expanded to attain regional, national, and international relevance. The park and the biosphere reserve, led by Ricardo Rozzi and his team, have made significant progress in demonstrating the way academic research supports local cultures, social processes, decision making, and conservation. It is a dynamic hive of investigators, artists, writers, students, volunteers, and friends, all exploring ways to better integrate academia and society. The initiative involves an informal consortium of institutions and organizations; in Chile, these include the University of Magallanes, the Omora Foundation, and the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity, and in the United States, the University of North Texas, the Omora Sub-Antarctic Research Alliance, and the Center for Environmental Philosophy at the University of North Texas. The consortium intends to function as a hub through which other institutions and organizations can be involved in research, education, and biocultural conservation. The park constitutes one of three long-term socio-ecological research sites in Chile of the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity.

Key words

Biodiversity conservation; sustainable development; environmental ethics; philosophy; Chile; Cape Horn
Top
Ecology and Society. ISSN: 1708-3087